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Author Topic: DoJ announces consent decree decision: No change, plus a new rule  (Read 1451 times)

Trip

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Does this mean what I think? It says our blanket licensing will continue.


http://rainnews.com/doj-announces-consent-decree-decision-no-change-plus-a-new-rule/

GabbyGary

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Re: DoJ announces consent decree decision: No change, plus a new rule
« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2016, 09:07:34 PM »
Thanks for posting the link.

Now, all we need is a legal explanation of exactly how this June, 30, 2016 information affects internet radio stations.
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mrbill

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Re: DoJ announces consent decree decision: No change, plus a new rule
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2016, 07:51:37 AM »
As I read it, it means that blanket licensing for song writers and publishers (BMI, ASCAP, and SESAC) will continue as it is.  This is good news for us.  What BMI and the others wanted was to do away with blanket licensing and force broadcasters and webcasters to strike individual deals with the publishing companies, which would be a mess for us.

Trip

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Re: DoJ announces consent decree decision: No change, plus a new rule
« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2016, 04:05:27 PM »
As I read it, it means that blanket licensing for song writers and publishers (BMI, ASCAP, and SESAC) will continue as it is.  This is good news for us.  What BMI and the others wanted was to do away with blanket licensing and force broadcasters and webcasters to strike individual deals with the publishing companies, which would be a mess for us.


That's kinda what I got out of it, that we will continue to have the blanket license option.

TheDrunkenScoundrel

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Re: DoJ announces consent decree decision: No change, plus a new rule
« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2016, 02:25:02 AM »
Along with that I think it is useful to acknowledge the use of the word "Byzantine" as a descriptor and the DoJ ruling in counter to it.
I know a very good lawyer who is also one of the smartest people I have ever met who gave me the best, most condensed lesson in reading legal documents:
"Any contract or law should read like plain English, if it reads too much like 'legalese' then it was either written by an idiot or by someone who was trying to *BLEEP* you..."
As old as those laws are, you can be sure there are probably aspects of both in there and this ruling (to me) is the government doing two things:
1. Trying to make it less complicated without untangling a massive birdsnest of regulations.
2. Trying to make it harder for people to get taken advantage-of.
In addition it also seems to me that, in this Post-Citizens United world, it helps the little guy and the government repel potentially negative changes forced-down everyone's throats by people with massive stacks of cash.
There is always a potentially onerous side to any regulations and this may also be something lobbied for by the NAB to help reduce their risk of paying certain fees that the PROs are asking for.
If it were up to me, for folks like us, there would be a 'Roadmap to Profitability" which would help the Webcasters grow there fanbase without bankrupting them.
One of the analysis I saw after the most recent CRB ruling stated that the price tag for growing a station to profitability from the gound-up could cost $10-13 million.
Ouch.